Should you add an environmental policy to your RFP?

Add an Environmental Policy to your RFP:

Many large corporations add their environmental policy statement to all outgoing RFQ or RFP’s when it pertains to contractors or suppliers providing a service both on or off their job-site which in any way may impact the environment. This is a good practice and it puts the contractor or supplier on notice that they are expected to meet or exceed your own company standard when it relates to protecting the environment.

There are many reasons why companies include the policy with their RFP’s.

[Read more…]

Purchase order Terms and Conditions

Purchase Order Terms and Conditions:

If you are looking for a BASIC Terms and Conditions (TC’s) template to use with your purchase order, the following set will get you going. If you typically do not include a set of TC’s with each purchase order you fax, email or transmit to your Suppliers, at the very least you should have each Vendor sign off on your TC’s and have them agree that all future purchase orders they fulfill will be bound by such TC’s.

These days digital storage is a cheap commodity so you can have the Vendor sign off on your TC’s and store the documents by way of pdf for future reference. This will give you some  peace of mind, necessary back-up and also allows you to avoid having to transmit them with each purchase order you issue. [Read more…]

FOB Point

FOB Point:

Lets talk about shipping terms and where the responsibility lies for a shipment.  The correct definition for FOB Point is Free-on-Board aka freight on board and the term FOB is often misunderstood, even by the professionals.

The FOB point is important as it ascertains:

  • when legal title of the goods being shipped transfers to the buyer. Say you were purchasing a bulk liquid like a fuel or a chemical, the FOB point could be origin, destination, buyers tank or even the intake nozzle at point of delivery.  As you can see, depending on the commodity, having the proper FOB point is crucial.
  • who is responsible for handling damaged goods or freight claims with the carrier in the event they are lost or damaged during shipment. An example: FOB Destination, Freight collect means: Buyer — Pays and is responsible for freight charges, Seller — Owns goods in transit, Seller — Files any damage claims (if any). Another potential headache area so choose wisely.
  • who pays the carrier.

Many will suggest or argue that FOB destination is the most beneficial because [Read more…]

Purchasing Glossary or Buzzwords

RFQ – RFP Glossary Buzzwords

Ever wonder what some of the terms used by Materials Managers and Purchasing Agents mean? Terms like RFQ, FOB, DNR , or a RFP, Vendor, Standing Order Agreement.  Although, these acronyms / terms are used frequently and recognized in the field, it is always a good idea to add them in their full context at least once or define the term on your definitions page to ensure there is no misunderstandings.  Here are a few terms commonly used in the Materials Management or procurement field:

RFQ – Request for Quote or Quotation
RFP – Request for Proposal
ITQ – Invitation to Quote
RFI – Request for Information
EOI – Expression of Interest
IFB – Invitation for Bids
ITT – Invitation to Tender
RFB – Request for Bid
LOI – Letter of Intent
LOU – Letter of Understanding
FOB – Free on Board

UTQ – Unable to Quote
DNR – Do not reorder
UTS – Unable to Supply

Standing Order – A standing order is an open ended purchase order or in essence open ended contract which grants authorization to make regular periodic shipments of a specified product. Usually an annual agreement.

Supplier – A provider of goods and services that typically bills on an invoice and has regular transactions with the Owner or Buyer.

Vendor – Another Name for a Supplier.

Compliance

  • Ensuring suppliers perform their obligations and supply goods in accordance with contracts or that services are performed as prescribed by site safety rules and regulation and certain federal, state or provincial laws.

Sample of a compliance clause in a supply agreement:

  • The goods called for in this agreement shall comply with all applicable codes, standards and/or both regulations of the governing inspection authorities at the place of use.  The Vendor shall acquire and keep in force all required permits and certificates of approval.   The Vendor shall comply with all provisions of law governing its performance under this agreement including, without limitation, Safety and Reclamation Codes,  all dangerous goods legislation and all workplace hazardous materials legislation and regulations governing the design, safety, handling, packaging, labeling, transport and the use of goods.

Due Diligence

  • Due diligence in a broad sense refers to the level of judgement, care, prudence, determination, and activity that a person would reasonably be expected to do under particular circumstances.

Force Majeure (sample clause)

  • No party hereto shall be liable for any delays in the performance of their obligation hereunder (excluding financial obligations) if any such delay or failure is due to acts of God, war, riot, sabotage, strikes, lockouts, or differences with workers, accidents, lack of water, power, gas, materials, any and all government laws or regulations, or any disabling cause beyond the reasonable control, and without the negligence of, the party invoking this clause.

Notice to the other party of any event of force majeure stating the date of the commencement thereof shall be promptly given and shall immediately be followed by a notice setting for the particulars of the event of force majeure and the expected delay.  The party so affected shall take all reasonable steps to remove the force majeure conditions and to resume, with the least possible delay, compliance with its obligations under this agreement, and shall promptly advise the other party of the date when the force majeure is ended.

Assignment (sample clause)

  • The Vendor may not assign or sublet any of its rights or obligations under the Agreement without the prior written consent of the Owner,  which consent may be arbitrarily withheld.

Interested in learning more or in acquiring an array of templates which cover the above terms? If you are planning to issue a RFP or RFQ, please visit our Special Offers page – RFQPro.com can help.

Terms and Conditions

Terms and Conditions with RFQ:

We encourage you to include the applicable Terms and Conditions (TC’s) with your RFQ package at time of issue so your Vendors can peruse them during the tender and understand what they will have to comply with if they are awarded the contract. In any event, after you have the bid results from your RFQ or RFP and have issued an award letter to the successful bidder, some Corporations will then provide a purchase order. With the purchase order, they usually include the TC’s and expect the Supplier or Vendor to follow them. The TC’s often include clauses relating to Insurance, Safety, Arbitration, Notices, Regulations, Payment and more.

See RFQ20 below where you can download our free set of terms and conditions. These can be used for a Supplier which has been awarded a contract to supply and erect purchased equipment on your property or you can massage them to relate to many other day to day applications.

Check back as we will be posting more generic versions soon. See RFQ42 post.

Download Terms and Conditions in PDF >>> RFQ20 – Terms and Conditions

Interested in an edit friendly word version please visit our Special Offers Page.